Don’t Just Sit There, Do Nothing

What I’m about to say is likely not going to be news for you, but it’s a critical reminder nonetheless. On the whole, we don’t have the cultural or individual maturity to handle the speed of innovation today. Technology is giving us incredible powers to get all kinds of information at our fingertips, but our minds don’t know how to control themselves. We multitask to get more done at once. One incredibly dangerous way more and more people are doing this is by checking email, text, and chat while they’re driving.

Ghandi said, “There is more to life than increasing its speed.”

As you read that quote you may have the common thought, “Of course, life isn’t all about increasing speed.”

Somehow our rational minds get that quote, but when it comes to the auto-pilot of everyday life, we’re drawn into a herd mentality of getting things done as quickly as possible so we can continue to get more done.

More than ever I find people (including myself at times) with a complete confusion around the notion of taking time to do absolutely nothing. Doing nothing means just sitting or lying down and resting. Why would we ever do that? Seems like such a waste of time.

Yet, this is what we long for when we go on relaxing vacations, to just sit around a pool or a park and just do nothing, sounds wonderful in that context.

I think it’s worth reconsidering how we’re spending our time. Do we turn on the tube, check our phones or get on the computer as soon as there’s a space to fill?

What about taking a short period in the week to just sit or lie down and do nothing? If you have an intimate partner, what about just lying down with them and doing nothing, maybe just free associate and talk. This is an especially great idea if you’re having relationship or communication issues. If you have kids, do this after you put them to bed. Even just 10 or 15 minutes is great.

So, what are you waiting for schedule in some nothing doin’ today. Don’t take my word for it, try it out for yourself, and let your experience be your teacher.

As always, please share your thoughts, stories and questions below. Your interaction creates a living wisdom for us all to benefit from.

Reposted from Elisha Goldstein’s Mindfulness Blog on Psychcentral.com

One Response to “Don’t Just Sit There, Do Nothing”

  1. Dzung Vo says:

    The art of mindful laziness is very healing, and deceptively challenging. I like the practice of having a “lazy day” set aside, with nothing on the schedule or agenda other than to be mindfully lazy. I try to practice this once a week if possible.

    This is especially important for the healthy development of our children and youth. Many of them need a break from being “overscheduled” and have some time for their minds and bodies for spontaneous play and relaxation.

    “Don’t just do something, sit there.”

    Dzung Vo, MD

Leave a Reply